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Body Language, It Could Be A Deal Breaker

September 22, 2016

When you enter the Interview room what do you do?

 

 

Do you shake the Interviewer’s hand?

 

 

Do you look them in the eye?

 

 

Do you sit slouched or too laid back?

 

 

 

When you are told to be relaxed and focused, it doesn’t mean be unprofessional! If you present yourself like the picture above, it could seriously damage your opportunity. Body language is just as important as what comes out of your mouth.

 

Studies have found that people will tend to believe the message coming from your body than from the words you say! Everyone can prepare well-defined answers to interview questions, be familiar with the job description and their own CV. But if you don’t believe in your own ability and what you are saying, it can be obvious to the Interviewer.

 

First Impression:

 

Interviews are similar to important first meetings; your success or otherwise can be determined or influenced by first impressions.

 

Your body language needs to reflect the type of job you are applying for and who you are. If you are a serious and formal person and applying for an innovative and creative job, it may not be appropriate. Understand what you do and what you are looking for so you may fit in. First impressions can be generated anywhere in the vicinity of your interview, from the entrance, to the waiting room or via the reception. You have no idea who may have a say in your acceptance. The key is to be ready so you look ready.

 

During the Interview:

 

You should never: You should never sit slouched or in any way show bad posture. Moving too fast and making extravagant hand gestures. Never making eye contact with the Interviewer and closing your body with your arms. When he/she extends for a handshake, you give them a floppy or overbearing hand shake. Making an uncertain facial expression when speaking confidently. Never roll your eyes or having no expression at all. Lastly, we all love our phones, but in the interview, put it away!

 

These are some examples of what you should never do at an Interview.

Body language is meant to be a natural and reflective expression of you. The key to have a balance between comfortable and forced. Body language that is too fake can be seen as forced and will give off a negative impression. Remind yourself to calm down and socialize with the interviewer, treat them as a formal friend. They are there to better understand you.

 

Departing:

 

When the interview is over, keep in mind they may still be observing you. This goes back to the point about forcing body language. You may be in the mindset of focusing and controlling your movements in the moment. If that control leaves and you are not actually the person you presented, it’ll show very clearly when you breathe that sigh of relief! Leave the same way you came in, calm and ready.

 

Take Home Message:

 

Body Language is the key to a positive first impression. You want the person sitting opposite you to believe what you say and that you are the right person for the job. There is a fine line between forced and formal. Be in control of yourself so that you will also be in control of your work. Nothing exaggerated and keep yourself open. Your Interview is not over till you say it’s over, keep fighting for that job opportunity.

 

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